Browsing Posts In: GDP

June 11, 2015 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

Consumers spent more, though not very robustly. That is still enough to propel the economy ahead and create jobs.  Because of the stronger sales gain via ecommerce, the demand for warehouse spaces will rise at a faster rate than for retail spaces. Specifically, retail sales increased 1.2 percent in May over the month and are […]

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May 29, 2015 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

An abysmal first quarter as GDP shrank 0.7 percent.  Because a large portion of the decline was attributed to a one-off adjustment, GDP should move to positive growth from the second quarter.  The job gains will continue and reach over 2 million this year and thereby support real estate activity.  Still, the negative first quarter […]

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May 22, 2015 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

There is no inflation.  The Federal Reserve can therefore relax and not hurry in raising rates.  However, housing costs continue to rise above the comfort level. Specifically, the Consumer Price Index declined 0.1 percent in April over the past 12 months.  Food prices are up by 2 percent and shelter prices are up by 3 […]

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April 30, 2015 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

The latest GDP growth rate was next to nothing.  Without GDP, job growth and home sales will come to a halt.  Luckily, the weak growth in the first quarter appears to be a one-off event.  The upcoming GDP numbers will be improving. The first quarter GDP growth rate was 0.2 percent.  After a couple of […]

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January 30, 2015 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

The U.S. economy grew in the final quarter of 2014, but at a slower pace.  A sizable reduction in national defense spending and weakening exports from the rising dollar were key reasons for the slower expansion.  Despite hitting the speed bump there is sufficient economic momentum for the economy to move ahead and easily avoid […]

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November 25, 2014 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

There has been a boom in total production in the U.S. as the third quarter GDP grew at a 3.9 percent annualized rate.  This growth is on top of the 4.6 percent expansion in the second quarter.  Such a boom, if it can be sustained, could yield fast job gains and higher wages. Unfortunately, GDP […]

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Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

There has been a boom in total production in the U.S. as the third quarter GDP grew at a 3.9 percent annualized rate.  This growth is on top of the 4.6 percent expansion in the second quarter.  Such a boom, if it can be sustained, could yield fast job gains and higher wages. Unfortunately, GDP […]

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October 31, 2014 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

The broadest measurement of the U.S. economy (GDP) expanded solidly in the third quarter at a 3.55 percent annualized rate.  This  marks two straight quarters of robust growth.  Growth at this rate can accelerate future job creations.  Still, we are missing consistency.  The first quarter was negative.  For the year as a whole in 2014, […]

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September 26, 2014 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

The economy grew solidly in the second quarter, expanding at a 4.6 percent annualized rate. Business spending and residential investment from new home construction are leading the way. Such a fabulous growth rate, if it can be sustained, will mean fast-paced job creation and meaningful wage growth. Unfortunately, the latest pop in GDP looks to […]

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September 19, 2014 Posted by: Lawrence Yun, PhD., Chief Economist and Senior Vice President

Both imports and exports are rising much faster than the broader economy. That means more companies are seeing faster sales growth to foreign buyers than to U.S. domestic buyers. A greater interaction with foreign economies, in turn, will mean increased demand for U.S. real estate by foreigners. Imports have been rising at 9 percent a […]

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